Fred Fields modeled his cover art for A Paladin In Hell (1998) after a section of the classic full-page art of the same name on page 23 of the Player’s Handbook (1978), drawn by David C. Sutherland III.

Fields was far from the only artist to draw inspiration from this classic Advanced Dungeons & Dragons art. Hack & Slash blog shows a number of examples.

 


The Paladins

Paladin - Players Handbook - David C Sutherland
Sutherland’s Paladin

 

Paladin - in Hell - Players Handbook - Fred Fields
Fields’ Paladin

 

The two Paladins are much alike, even down to fine details.

 


DSCN6088
Sutherland’s “A Paladin in Hell” is one of the few titled art pieces in early AD&D.


The Devils

Barbed Devil - Players Handbook - David C Sutherland
Sutherland’s Barbed Devil

 

Barbed Devil - Paladin in Hell - Fred Fields
Fields’ Barbed Devil

 

The Devils are quite different, though themes are retained, such as the barbed elbows, knees, and continuous barbs.

 


The Barbed Devil

Let’s compare Sutherland’s Barbed Devil with the illustration by another great D&D artist, David A. Trampier in the Monster Manual (1977), page 21.

Barbed Devil - Monster Manual - David A Trampier
Trampier’s Barbed Devil

 

Barbed Devil - Players Handbook - David C Sutherland
Sutherland’s Barbed Devil

 

The two portraits are very consistent: Head horns, hook nose, fangs, knee and elbow barbs, tail spikes.

I don’t know which came first. The Monster Manual predates the Players Handbook by a year, but that may or may not be relevant.

 


A Paladin in Hell in the shop

Amazon

DriveThruRPG

 

Players Handbook in the shop

Amazon

DriveThruRPG

 


See also: Council of Wyrms: THE OLD SCHOOL DRAGONS

Holmes Dungeons & Dragons, ready for the road

D&D: David C. Sutherland’s Red Dragon

World of Greyhawk, folio edition (3rd print) – A thing of beauty